Thursday, May 10, 2012

Thankful Thursday: Editor Spotlight

210 pages or 70,680 words of the "vomit draft" ready for the red pen.
The revision process is under way for my memoir. During the time I didn't touch the manuscript file, I read many posts on revising your work. I saved some of those to share for my Thankful Thursday posts in May.

Today, I wanted to share links to the Editor Spotlight series by Karen S. Elliott, The Word Shark. Karen offers proofreading, copy editing, and critique services on her blog, but she isn't writing these posts. No. She's paying it forward by highlighting other editors in the series. She's that cool.

This is a note Karen shared at the bottom of one of the Editor Spotlight posts:
I realize that not every editor/proofreader is perfect for every writer. This is why I am presenting the series, Editor Spotlight. If you know an editor or proofreader who would like to participate, ask them to contact me at karenselliott AT midco DOT net. The Editor Spotlight series will be presented throughout the next several months in between my regular blog posts and special theme weeks. – Karen S. Elliott
I've found the posts informative. Here are links to the posts in the series:


My best take away after reading all these posts — get your work in its best shape before you turn it over to an editor. It will save you time, money and maybe a little heartache.

This week, Karen shares a Tribute to Moms — Mothers' Week. These posts have been uplifting, thoughtful and helpful. For writers, you may find the post The magic of home-made chapbooks by Shawn MacKenzie helpful. Happy early Mother's Day to all my mom friends!

How do you edit your work — do you hire an editor, use a critique group or something else?

28 comments:

  1. Thank you, Stacy, I wasn't aware of this series and it does look helpful and generous. I like your tip about no submitting to an editor prematurely, and I do think It can be worth trying different editors to find the style that really suits you.

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  2. Congrats on getting the words down on paper :)

    Am excited to read it one of these days!

    I *will* be using an editor once WIP is ready.. I think a professional, fresh eye on things is going to be a real help :)

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    1. Mark, Thanks. A fresh eye is important. Good luck with your WIP!

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  3. Great post Ms. Jensen! I like learning about things like this. The writing/editing/publishing process is interesting to me and important to me :)

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    1. Erik, It is an important process whether we read or write.

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  4. Wow, what a wonderful post. I'm feeling all warm and fuzzy! Thank you so much for the great feature, Stacy.

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    1. Karen, You are a warm fuzzy! Thanks for the series. Really a lot of food for thought during the revision process.

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  5. Nice work on finishing your first draft!
    Barbara
    Grade ONEderful
    Ruby Slippers

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  6. Thanks for this info Stacy--I've been compiling a list for when I'm ready. I think I will be using an editor for my current WIP. I've had some critiques and once I make some more changes, I think I will go the pro edit way.
    Congrats on moving on to the next step!

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    1. Coleen. You'll have to let me (us) know how that goes.

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  7. I think there is a move towards hiring your own editor before submitting. I'd definitely consider it for a novel, not sure about my stuff though. Like joanna says it looks very helpful and generous.

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    1. Catherine, Yep. It seems like there's a move toward this, but I know lots of people still don't. The evidence? The self-published books that don't seem to be edited. Some writers use only crit groups before submissions. Like so many things in the writing business, lots to consider.

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  8. Congrats on finishing your draft!!! :) And thanks for sharing Karen's links - very helpful!

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  9. Thank you Stacy. Have used Karen's shark editing talents and she's very good! Am alos glad to know about the series and other involved. Even though I did copy editing -- can't do my own work!

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    1. Patricia, Very few people can edit their own work. Yes. Karen is good.

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  10. Great links on a great blog! I'm glad to hear you've started revisions. :)

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  11. Hi Stacy! I like how you call it the "vomit draft." Good luck with that red pen.

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  12. I'm so glad you shared this resource because I may too be in the market for an editor soon. I'd never heard of Karen's site, so I'm going to go bookmark it now!

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    1. Julie, I've met several good editors at the Pikes Peak Writer's Conference too (from the Boulder area). If you ever need a name, from your neighborhood.

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  13. Congrats, Stacy! Yep, I use an editor--and a critique group. The system I've developed (I'm a pantster) is: vomit draft is just for me (draft zero). Once I've revised that into a semblance of a first draft, it goes to the critique group, chapter by chapter--they help me make focused edits: echoes, repetitive scenes, plot logistics, beta-reader feedback like stakes and tension, character development, etc. Once that results in a second draft, it's editor time--full-length ms issues like where the story needs to start, scene cutting/synthesizing, where to add or cut backstory, subplot analysis, etc. It's working great for me!

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    1. Guilie, My vomit draft may be a zero too. Just digging in now.

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  14. I'm lucky to have a very good writers group here in Spain. Three people do most of my beta reading and with my Civil War novel they took it from three very different angles. One was focused on the military aspects, one on character motivation, and the third on grammar and plot construction. Together they gave me a complete picture!

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    1. Sean, You are lucky to have those beta readers. Great point that people can check for different elements of the story, too.

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